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User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction (UMUAI) provides an interdisciplinary forum for the dissemination of new research results on interactive computer systems that can be adapted or adapt themselves to their current users, and on the role of user models in the adaptation process.

UMUAI has been published since 1991 by Kluwer Academic Publishers (now merged with Springer Verlag).

UMUAI homepage with description of the scope of the journal and instructions for authors.

Springer UMUAI page with online access to the papers.

Latest Results for User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction

The latest content available from Springer
  • A therapy-driven gamification framework for hand rehabilitation

    Abstract

    Rehabilitative therapy is usually very expensive and confined to specialized rehabilitation centers or hospitals, leading to slower recovery times for corresponding patients. Therefore, there is a high demand for the development of technology-based personalized solutions to guide and encourage patients towards performing online rehabilitation program that can help them live independently at home. This paper introduces an innovative e-health framework that develops adaptive serious games for people with hand disabilities. The aim of this work is to provide a patient-adaptive environment for the gamification of hand therapies in order to facilitate and encourage rehabilitation issues. Theoretical foundations (i.e., therapy and patient models) and algorithms to match therapy-based hand gestures to navigational movements in 3D space within the serious game environment have been developed. A novel game generation module is introduced, which translates those movements into a 3D therapy-driven route on a real-world map and with different levels of difficulty based on the patient profile and capabilities. In order to enrich the user navigation experience, a 3D spatio-temporal validation region is also generated, which tracks and adjusts the patient movements throughout the session. The gaming environment also creates and adds semantics to different types of attractive and repellent objects in space depending on the difficulty level of the game. Relevant benchmarks to assess the patient interaction with the environment along with a usability and performance testing of our framework are introduced to ensure quantitative as well as qualitative improvements. Trial tests in one disability center were conducted with a total number of five subjects, having hand motor controls problems, who used our gamified physiotherapy solution to help us in measuring the usability and users’ satisfaction levels. The obtained results and feedback from therapists and patients are very encouraging.

  • MobiGuide: a personalized and patient-centric decision-support system and its evaluation in the atrial fibrillation and gestational diabetes domains

    Abstract

    MobiGuide is a ubiquitous, distributed and personalized evidence-based decision-support system (DSS) used by patients and their care providers. Its central DSS applies computer-interpretable clinical guidelines (CIGs) to provide real-time patient-specific and personalized recommendations by matching CIG knowledge with a highly-adaptive patient model, the parameters of which are stored in a personal health record (PHR). The PHR integrates data from hospital medical records, mobile biosensors, data entered by patients, and recommendations and abstractions output by the DSS. CIGs are customized to consider the patients’ psycho-social context and their preferences; shared decision making is supported via decision trees instantiated with patient utilities. The central DSS “projects” personalized CIG-knowledge to a mobile DSS operating on the patients’ smart phones that applies that knowledge locally. In this paper we explain the knowledge elicitation and specification methodologies that we have developed for making CIGs patient-centered and enabling their personalization. We then demonstrate feasibility, in two very different clinical domains, and two different geographic sites, as part of a multi-national feasibility study, of the full architecture that we have designed and implemented. We analyze usage patterns and opinions collected via questionnaires of the 10 atrial fibrillation (AF) and 20 gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients and their care providers. The analysis is guided by three hypotheses concerning the effect of the personal patient model on patients and clinicians’ behavior and on patients’ satisfaction. The results demonstrate the sustainable usage of the system by patients and their care providers and patients’ satisfaction, which stems mostly from their increased sense of safety. The system has affected the behavior of clinicians, which have inspected the patients’ models between scheduled visits, resulting in change of diagnosis for two of the ten AF patients and anticipated change in therapy for eleven of the twenty GDM patients.

  • Preface to the UMUAI special issue on the impact of learner modeling
  • Affective learning: improving engagement and enhancing learning with affect-aware feedback

    Abstract

    This paper describes the design and ecologically valid evaluation of a learner model that lies at the heart of an intelligent learning environment called iTalk2Learn. A core objective of the learner model is to adapt formative feedback based on students’ affective states. Types of adaptation include what type of formative feedback should be provided and how it should be presented. Two Bayesian networks trained with data gathered in a series of Wizard-of-Oz studies are used for the adaptation process. This paper reports results from a quasi-experimental evaluation, in authentic classroom settings, which compared a version of iTalk2Learn that adapted feedback based on students’ affective states as they were talking aloud with the system (the affect condition) with one that provided feedback based only on the students’ performance (the non-affect condition). Our results suggest that affect-aware support contributes to reducing boredom and off-task behavior, and may have an effect on learning. We discuss the internal and ecological validity of the study, in light of pedagogical considerations that informed the design of the two conditions. Overall, the results of the study have implications both for the design of educational technology and for classroom approaches to teaching, because they highlight the important role that affect-aware modelling plays in the adaptive delivery of formative feedback to support learning.

  • Elo-based learner modeling for the adaptive practice of facts

    Abstract

    We investigate applications of learner modeling in a computerized adaptive system for practicing factual knowledge. We focus on areas where learners have widely varying degrees of prior knowledge. We propose a modular approach to the development of such adaptive practice systems: dissecting the system design into an estimation of prior knowledge, an estimation of current knowledge, and the construction of questions. We provide a detailed discussion of learner models for both estimation steps, including a novel use of the Elo rating system for learner modeling. We implemented the proposed approach in a system for practising geography facts; the system is widely used and allows us to perform evaluation of all three modules. We compare the predictive accuracy of different learner models, discuss insights gained from learner modeling, as well as the impact different variants of the system have on learners’ engagement and learning.